Winners 2016

Winners listing 2016

Take a look at the pharmacy stars who stood out at the C+D Awards 2016, and read their stories to get inspiration and ideas on how to create your own stellar entry

You'll also be able to view our runners-up and highly commended entrants, to get a sense of who else made the shortlist.

Ready to shine ? Enter an Award today!

Winners 2016

Business Initiative of the Year

Business Initiative of the Year
Runner Up: Whitworth Chemists, Fitzwilliam, West Yorkshire
This pharmacy's staff were set a challenge by their superintendent of driving greater patient involvement with the business. They tackled it by making the brave decision to invite patients to be brutally honest about the pharmacy’s service and what it could do better. This kick-started a dialogue that helped patients better understand the pressures the pharmacy is under. The result was a new unique perspective for the business, with locals regularly attending patient participation group meetings - embedding their views at the heart of the services they receive.
What the judges said
Shaped the pharmacy offering to meet the needs of the local community. We can all learn from this example!
Business Initiative of the Year
Runner Up: Day Lewis Support Office
What the judges said
This innovation has enormous commercial potential and would be welcomed by community pharmacies across the country.
Business Initiative of the Year
Runner Up: Day Lewis Support Office
What the judges said
An excellent example of changing the future generations of GPs and pharmacists to enhance collaborative working practice

Public Health Initiative of the Year

Public Health Initiative of the Year
Runner Up: Community Pharmacy West Yorkshire
Statistics about the lowered life expectancy for people with learning difficulties spurred Leeds clinical commissioning group (CCG) to ask Community Pharmacy West Yorkshire (CPWY) for a solution. The result was the Making Time project. The premise is simple: make more time available to speak to these patients about medicines, health advice and signposting to other local services. The project is not limited to patients themselves, but also provides support to their carers, family and members of local adult social care teams. Realising that some pharmacists and their staff felt ill-equipped to deal with patients with learning difficulties, CPWY offered training and networking events – as well as a service guide – to give teams the confidence to visit supported living accommodation. There’s even a newsletter available for participating pharmacies to share their learning and ideas. While CPWY awaits a detailed evaluation of the project from Bradford University, anecdotal evidence from the more than 40 patients currently supported suggests it is already having a huge impact on patients’ lives.
What the judges said
This initiative demonstrates everything good about community pharmacy. It gives a vulnerable group the one thing others cannot – time.
Public Health Initiative of the Year
Runner Up: Superdrug, substance misuse services
What the judges said
They tackled a significant problem by showcasing what pharmacy can do and developing enhanced relationships with important commissioners.

GP Partnership of the Year

GP Partnership of the Year
Runner Up: Community Pharmacy Sheffield
This ambitious, city-wide project was launched in October 2015 and has seized upon the challenge of breaking down the traditional barriers between GPs and community pharmacists. It is the largest programme of its kind in the UK, with 57 pharmacists working closely alongside local GPs for up to two sessions each week. It has expanded the skills, motivation and standing of pharmacists in the local community, and measurably reduced GP workload. But where the scheme really stands out is in the difference pharmacists make to patients right at the sharp end of primary care: older people, housebound or vulnerable patients discharged from hospital; as well as patients with complex needs and multiple medicines.
What the judges said
A fantastic achievement with so much potential. A huge project which can’t be ignored.
GP Partnership of the Year
Runner Up: CEPN Pharmacy Project
What the judges said
An excellent example of changing the future generations of GPs and pharmacists to enhance collaborative working practice.

Pharmacy Team of the Year

Pharmacy Team of the Year
Runner Up: Bedminster Pharmacy, Bristol
Bedminster Pharmacy goes above and beyond to provide high quality patient care and raise the profile of the profession in Bristol. By setting up numerous services – such as a men’s health initiative and sun awareness campaign – the team has had a positive impact on the health of the community it serves. They make sure the pharmacy offers a broad range of services to suit all age ranges – although the elderly is its core patient group, it is one of four pharmacies in Bristol acknowledged for delivering services tailored to young people. Staff have put in the hours to make sure their knowledge is up to scratch and many are even involved with a mentoring scheme. It was one of the first pharmacies in the south-west to gain Healthy Living Pharmacy accreditation and successfully ran a pregnancy advisory service in response to a fatal postnatal incident locally. Bedminster Pharmacy has found the perfect balance between building a strong brand and excelling commercially, while keeping patient care at the centre of its ethos.
What the judges said
This entry stood out because the philosophy of the team is entirely focused on improving outcomes for individuals and the community it serves.
Pharmacy Team of the Year
Runner Up: Whitworth Chemists, Fitzwilliam, West Yorkshire
What the judges said
This entry really stood out for the emphasis placed on improving outcomes for the individuals and community that they serve, while supporting each other as colleagues.

Independent Pharmacy of the Year

Independent Pharmacy of the Year
Runner Up: Mayberry Pharmacy Group
This independent pharmacy business is always a step ahead of the rest – it has been operating a hub-and-spoke dispensing model across its seven branches in South Wales for nearly five years, which has freed up pharmacists’ time considerably. Each branch hits its 400 MUR target and the company has used social media to generate a 400% increase in its smoking cessation programme. Redesigning its dispensing process also involved introducing automatic stock control and simplifying medicines purchasing among other things – all of which reduced the admin time for staff.
What the judges said
Mayberry Pharmacy has shown what can be achieved by strong local collaboration. The benefits to patients, GPs and the pharmacy are there to be seen.
Independent Pharmacy of the Year
Runner Up: Abbey Pharmacy, Rotherham
What the judges said
Despite being remote from surgeries and facing significant competition, the pharmacy has grown its business through private and locally commissioned services with good use of automation to free up pharmacist time.

Community Pharmacist of the Year

Community Pharmacist of the Year
Runner Up: Olutayo Arikawe, Priory Community Pharmacy, Dudley
Olutayo leads a team serving one of the most deprived communities in the West Midlands. She joined Priory Community Pharmacy in December 2012, when the business was struggling financially, and set out to turn its fortunes around with a mix of professional guidance and patient feedback. She also supported her team – through training, support and mentoring – to gain accreditation and give them the confidence to go out into the community to find people in need of health advice. As a result, they have run health promotions everywhere from libraries, colleges and pubs, to gyms, hospitals and supermarkets. This outgoing attitude has even extended to setting up a fitness studio, organising an annual ‘health funfair’ to raise money for charity, and various clinical initiatives targeted at cancer, alcohol abuse, public health and sexual health. Olutayo also plays a part in developing new pharmacists by lecturing at the University of Wolverhampton.
What the judges said
Olutayo is an inspiring leader [with] an exceptional commitment to personal development, combining pharmacy and public health qualifications. She provides a great example to all.
Community Pharmacist of the Year
Runner Up: Mike Morton, Whitworth Chemists, Murton
What the judges said
By running a truly excellent pharmacy operation, Mike has created time for his patients through efficiency. He spends that time delivering improved outcomes through service delivery and patient care.

Manager of the Year

Manager of the Year
Runner Up: Olutayo Arikawe, Priory Pharmacy, Dudley
Olutayo joined Priory Pharmacy in December 2012, at a time when it was struggling to provide services and patients’ confidence in the business was low. She decided to turn the pharmacy around, and supported her team to gain accreditation for all the services offered in Dudley. Olutayo has helped her patients improve their health, with notable interventions including helping a customer smoking 100 cigarettes a day to kick the habit and referring a patient to the alcohol team for support with addiction. As well as managing to run annual health funfairs, carol services and piloting a fitness studio, she has an excellent rapport with customers, and knows almost all of them by name. She always adds a personal touch to her interactions, discussing issues they brought up with her last time they were in the pharmacy to show that she never forgets a face.
What the judges said
Amongst a very strong field of candidates for this award, Olutayo stands out as being an exceptional manager. Her pharmacy is a major community resource, involving patients and the community every step of the way.
Manager of the Year
Runner Up: Montse Moya, Whitworth Chemists, Hull
What the judges said
This is a fine example of a passionate pharmacist, embracing new services, working across professional boundaries and leading a well-motivated team

The Medicines Optimisation Award

The Medicines Optimisation Award
Runner Up: Weldricks, Scunthorpe
This pharmacy’s intervention service sought to take practical steps to improve its patients’ medicines optimisation. The team works constructively with three local GP practices to identify and solve reoccurring medicines problems, as well as highlighting any potential risks involved. For example, identifying that many prescriptions of ticagrelor did not have an end date for treatment, the firm recommended the practices add these dates, and also raise awareness that allowing treatment with this drug to continue indefinitely would result in an increased risk of bleeding. Doubling the number of pharmacists on duty has allowed them to expand the service from simple conversations about medicines quantity to complex interventions on topics such as a patient’s correct supply of insulin. Having two multilingual pharmacists on the team also helps overcome any communication issues with patients from the local Polish and South Asian communities. When it comes to judging the service’s success, the numbers speak for themselves – more than 4,300 interventions were conducted in 2015.
What the judges said
This is a great example of local commissioners identifying both a need and a commissioning solution.
The Medicines Optimisation Award
Runner Up: Superdrug Pharmacy, Camberley, Surrey
What the judges said
This unique service demonstrate the ability of community pharmacists to become experts in a specialist field and deliver innovative healthcare.

The Training and Development Award

The Training and Development Award
Runner Up: CEPN Pharmacy Project
This project took the NHS Five Year Forward View’s call for multi-professional communication and understanding to heart and established a scheme that organised and fully evaluated placements of preregistration pharmacists into GP practices. New lines of communication have been opened between the two professions, often for the first time, and there is a better understanding of the expertise they can each offer to their patients. The pharmacists involved – drawn from a wide range of pharmacy businesses in Kent, Surrey and Sussex – were able to forge closer links with GP practices and there is now a group of newly qualified pharmacists who have a deeper understanding of how their GP colleagues operate. The project was so successful that it will be repeated in 2016, but this time GP trainees will spend time in community pharmacies to gain experience of the services offered. A wider rollout into London is also in the pipeline.
What the judges said
The multi-professional nature of this project, as well as the range of stakeholders involved, is what made this project stand out for me.
The Training and Development Award
Runner Up: Priory Community Pharmacy, Dudley
What the judges said
The multi-professional nature of this project, as well as the range of stakeholders involved, is what made this project stand out for me.

Pharmacy Staff Member of the Year

Pharmacy Staff Member of the Year
Runner Up: Joanne Wilson, Cornwell’s Chemists, Holmcroft, Stafford
Joanne is qualified far beyond her role as a healthcare assistant, with training as a Dementia Friend, a Healthy Living Pharmacy champion, a smoking cessation advisor and a minor ailments practitioner. Joanne takes the time to give each and every one of her patients a warm reception. She is always willing to do whatever she can to improve patient care, including delivering vital medication herself if the pharmacy’s delivery driver has left for the day. She will also work whenever she is needed to ensure the pharmacy is adequately staffed. Patients know they can depend on Joanne. She is always happy to visit them, phoning an ambulance when needed and even helping out with their cleaning while they wait. Her dedication to her role led to her saving the life of one individual, who had taken an overdose. Joanne’s actions mean the patient is now seeking help in rehab.
What the judges said
Joanne has given support to other pharmacy team members, covering for whatever role is required of her, and going above and beyond in patient care.
Pharmacy Staff Member of the Year
Runner Up: Zoe Hatch, The Hub Pharmacy, Chorley
What the judges said
Zoe’s practical approach to supporting the team and pharmacy dispensing processes enhance efficiency through innovation and mentoring staff for the best effect.

Clinical Service of the Year

Clinical Service of the Year
Runner Up: Day Lewis, Bromley, London
Patients are often required to travel long distances if they need to access a warfarin clinic. Not so in Lewisham, where a small number of pharmacies were commissioned to deliver this service themselves. The Day Lewis branch in Bromley grabbed this opportunity with both hands, offering two clinics a week – as well as domiciliary visits – to ease the burden on the overstretched local hospital. The pharmacy’s INR testing service means patients can access their regular blood checks far closer to home. Rather than waiting for the hospital to phone them back with their test results, the pharmacy can provide patients with these, and any dose adjustments, immediately. It’s little wonder that both local GPs and Lewisham Hospital are now keen to signpost people to the pharmacy. The service’s popularity has even had a knock-on effect for the rest of the pharmacy’s offering, contributing to a 5% growth in prescription volume and a successful flu vaccination programme.
What the judges said
An example of utilising the skills of the whole pharmacy team to decrease the burden on GP practices and hospital outpatients.
Clinical Service of the Year
Runner Up: Superdrug, substance misuse services
What the judges said
Superdrug has created a one-stop-shop for traditionally marginalised patients, in an environment that overcomes the barriers faced by this cohort [of patients].

Pre-registration Graduate of the Year

Pre-registration Graduate of the Year
Runner Up: Susannah Probert, Mayberry Pharmacy, Trevethin, South Wales
Susannah took the lead on Mayberry Pharmacy’s pioneering project to reduce medicines wastage through GP partnerships. Her hard work has led to countless professional and clinical benefits for the rest of her team, as well as improving her own negotiation and communication skills. The project resulted in reduced medicines wastage at the pharmacy’s local GP surgery – which serves more than 15,000 people – by a staggering 80%. It also led to a higher number of medicines use reviews and bolstered the pharmacy’s relationship with local doctors. Their confidence in the pharmacy’s repeat prescription service was buoyed, while uptake for this service increased by 25% as a result of the project. The pharmacy was then able to take all it had learnt from Susannah’s hardwork and collaborative approach and apply it to similar projects with other surgeries, as well as enhancing its relationships with local care homes, nurses and social workers.
What the judges said
This was an innovative and timely project, showing good integration. Susannah has clearly learnt a lot and used opportunities for learning wisely.
Pre-registration Graduate of the Year
Runner Up: Ellie Robinson, Boots, Chelmsley Wood, Solihull
What the judges said
Many pre-registration students could learn from Ellie’s willingness to engage at a pharmacy and organisational level.
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