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Average male pharmacist's pay is £2k more than female in same role

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The average male manager and employee pharmacist salary is 5% higher than femal equivalents
The average male manager and employee pharmacist salary is 5% higher than female equivalents

Male employee community pharmacists and branch managers earn on average £2,000 more than female pharmacists in the same role, according to C+D's Salary Survey 2017.

The responses to the survey – which ran throughout October 2017 – found the average salary of 243 male branch managers, and “second or non-manager community pharmacists” was 5% higher than 252 women in the survey undertaking the same roles.

Pharmacy chains with over 250 staff are now required by law to publish details of their gender pay gap. Boots, Well and Lloydspharmacy have all revealed the gender pay gap between their male and female employees – which includes community pharmacists along with other staff.

The gender pay gap is a measure of the difference between men’s and women’s average earnings across a company, regardless of role or seniority.

In contrast, C+D's exclusive analysis focuses on equal pay – the legal requirement that men and women in the same employment, performing equal work, must receive the same wages.

The Salary Survey results reveal male and female community pharmacists employed in the same role within the sector do not receive equal pay.

Use C+D's interactive tool (below) to explore the difference in pay between men and women in community pharmacy.

Pharmacy role
You think women earn
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more than men
Men earn more than women
Women earn more than men
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£5k
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C+D readers think...
Women Earn
£1350
more than men
The C+D Salary Survey found...
Women Earn
£1123
more than men
The C+D Salary Survey found...
Men Earn
£2064
more than Women
The C+D Salary Survey found...
Men Earn
£2439
more than Women
The average female locum pharmacist earns £20.90 per hour, equivalent to £43,472 a year (at 40 hours per week)
The average male locum earns £20.36 per hour, equivalent to £42,349 a year – that’s £1,123 (3%) less than women
The average female employee pharmacist working 35-45 hours per week earns £38,584
The average male earns £40,648 – that’s £2,064 (5%) more than women
The average female branch manager working 35-45 hours per week earns £44,660
The average male earns £47,099 – that’s £2,439 (5%) more than women
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5% pay difference

The average salary of 162 male branch managers working between 35 and 45 hours a week was £47,099, compared with £44,660 for 169 female branch managers – a difference of £2,439, or 5%.

The average salary difference was slightly smaller – at £2,064 (also 5%) – between the 164 second or non-manager community pharmacists in the survey who worked between 35 and 45 hours a week. The 81 men in these roles earned an average of £40,648 a year, compared with the £38,584 average salary paid to 83 women with the same role.

Locum pay rate bucks trend

C+D’s analysis of average hourly locum pay rates shows this pay difference is reversed among the 248 locum pharmacists (126 men and 122 women) who responded to the survey.

The average hourly pay rate of a female locum pharmacist in the survey was £20.90 per hour – 54 pence more than the average for men, at £20.36. This is equivalent to £1,123 more a year for female pharmacists working 40 hours a week.

Read C+D’s in-depth analysis of equal pay in community pharmacy, and the gender pay gap – including sector leaders' thoughts on why the differences exist here.

The C+D Salary Survey 2017 ran throughout October 2017 and was completed by a total of 1,754 pharmacists and pharmacy staff. C+D's ongoing coverage of the survey can be found here.

Search through hundreds of pharmacist roles on the C+D Jobs website

13 Comments
Question: 
What do you think the reasons for unequal pay in the sector are?

James Mac, Community pharmacist

If there are more females on the register than men then however much a male individual is paid, the group of females both takes overall the majority of pay and also will make the majority of spending of both sets of pay (Jordan Peterson mentioned that about 80% of consumer spend is done by women). When I worked in pharmacies there might be 2 men on staff and 15 women. I would not be surprised if pharmacy settles at a population of males similar to nursing. I also would not recommend pharmacy as a career in general to males, who are less resilient in terms of their ability to pick up another career or lifestyle if needed. Why politicise the theoretical pay gap but refer to the locum gap- which favours females- as a "negative gap"? Surely that's just as unfair and hints that women get more choice as regards to working time and hours?

James Mac, Community pharmacist

Statistic http://www.genderleadershipgroup.com/the-inclusionary-leadership-blog/210

Chris Pharmacist, Community pharmacist

But annual salaries are likely to be lower for women as they are more likely to work fewer hours than men...its still the norm for women to primarily (but obviously not always) fit their hours around childcare...we need to be comparing hourly rates...

Its interesting when hourly rates are compared (for locums) that women are actually paid a higher rate.

Abid P, Primary care pharmacist

Not possible to just compare gender pay like this when location and amount of work your pharmacy does affect the pay you get. Managers of busier pharmacies should expect more pay. Working in a remote location where recruitment is more difficult also raises pay.

Gerry Diamond, Primary care pharmacist

Good to see a balanced report that categorically states the gender pay differential is fact, and highlights the need for this issue to have closure with salaries being equalized on merit rather than sex.

Pharmacist Pharmacist, Community pharmacist

I personally do not believe that in Pharmacy gender is taken into account by management when considering a salary. I just feel that women will get a pay increase now only because they are female and for companies to comply with equal pay arrangements. Its the same in each industry where companies are forced to take on women, men etc only to fulfil the requirement, regardless of experience. I am all for equal rights, but I am also for employing the correct worthy person for the job regardless of gender, ethnicity, etc etc

Gerry Diamond, Primary care pharmacist

Believe what you want but this report puts facts and figures to state there is an issue. You are in denial. We need equality to be the norm not the excpetion!

Pharmacist Pharmacist, Community pharmacist

Gerry this report has not looked at all factors. Its a little more complicated than working out some averages

Lucky Ex-Locum, Superintendent Pharmacist

Finally! We get something significant. This is actually pretty scandalous if this is true. The same role should have the same pay (once experience is taken into account, I suppose) regardless of sex, age, colour or any other lines upon which you can divide our sad species. Is it possibly because women have a greater tendency to take on a second pharmacist (and therefore slightly less well paid) role within an organisation or is it that women have much more sense than us blokes and avoid the management jobs like the plague that they are?

Pharmacist Pharmacist, Community pharmacist

A 5% difference is hardly significant

Lucky Ex-Locum, Superintendent Pharmacist

I'd call 2 grand a year pretty significant.

Caroline Jones, Community pharmacist

Doesn't surprise me at all....especially when there is often no company pay scale....pay tends to be what the individual has managed to negotiate! Locum rates are slightly different I think as the Pharmacist is self employed so accepts or declines a rate of pay

A B, Community pharmacist

This is a very good point. If a company has no pay scale for managers or pharmacists then it is hard to compare salaries. I've worked for a large chain and I had no idea what other people (male or female) earned doing the same role in other branches.

 

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