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GPs' 1% pay rise in 'stark contrast' to pharmacy cuts

Sue Sharpe: GPs got an "acceptable" deal from the NHS

The NHS's collaboration with GPs is very different to the "uncompromising" attitude shown to pharmacists, says PSNC CEO Sue Sharpe

A 1% pay rise for GPs is in "stark contrast" to the government's decision to slash pharmacy funding, the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC) has said.

The GP contract for 2016-17, announced today (February 19), will also see their payments for immunisations rise from £7.64 to £9.80.

PSNC chief executive Sue Sharpe said the collaboration between GP leaders and the NHS to find an “acceptable" contract for the profession was very different to the “uncompromising series of assertions” the Department of Health (DH) has made about pharmacy in recent months.

"[The DH's] approach is, sadly, a far cry from the open and constructive discussions we have had in the past,” she added.

NHS England announced last December that spending on GP services would grow by at least 4% every year for the next five years.
 



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14 Comments

Stephen Eggleston, Community pharmacist

To have leverage you have to be in a position to control something that someone else wants. If GPs go on strike, who fills the gap? - No-one. If Pharmacists go on strike, either dispensing doctors or other Pharmacists are more than happy to undermine us.

Shaun Steren, Pharmaceutical Adviser

Go on strike as a pharmacist contractor - another pharmacist contractor will happily take your business from you. Go on strike as an employee pharmacist - a corporate pharmacist (area manager/regional manager) will mark your card. Shortage of pharmacists - locum pharmacists screw the contractor pharmacists. Excess of pharmacists - contractor pharmacists screw the locum pharmacists. Ethical pharmacist raises concerns regarding targets - corporate shyster pharmacist threatens them with performance management. Evidence-based pharmacist raises concerns regarding cost-effectivness of activities - 'blue sky visionary' pharmacist slurs them as a Luddite. Locum pharmacist works in a chaotic disorganised branch and achieves little - pharmacist manager has them blacklisted with the locum board. Pharmacist manager is off on a quiet day - locum pharmacist does the bare miminum to get through the day. I could go on all day with this game. When is this strike again? 

Stephen Eggleston, Community pharmacist

To have leverage you have to be in a position to control something that someone else wants. If GPs go on strike, who fills the gap? - No-one. If Pharmacists go on strike, either dispensing doctors or other Pharmacists are more than happy to undermine us.

Amal England, Public Relations

Message for Sue Sharpe: In my opinion this position is a disgrace.*

*This comment has been edited for breaching C+D's community standards*

 

Gerry Diamond, Primary care pharmacist

DoH have just pi...ed all over pharmacists shoes and farted in our face as a profession.

Kevin Western, Community pharmacist

So when the PSNC keeps  telling us that being confrontational with the DOH gets you nowhere and being nicey nicey and sucking up does we should give them a pat on the back then.....

Anonymous Anonymous, Information Technology

It's a sorry state of affairs when you envy a 1% pay rise! I'm off to work for a bank... Last one out turn the lights off!

S Morein, Pharmacy Area manager/ Operations Manager

A GP practice makes less profit per patient than a Pharmacy contractor even including the hidden extras of a NHS pension, cost rental etc.

Contracors have been vastly over remunerated for decades.

Amal England, Public Relations

S Morein, please continue and enlighten me. Now let me enlighten you: My GP mate has his rent paid by the NHS, within this building there are empty rooms, which him and his partners rent out, the proceeds of which goes into their pockets. I have been to see my GP on many occasions, as a private patient- they always give me an appointment during normal hours of operation, I suppose the NHS is already paying him for this time. Yet he still charges me for the consultation and the prescription. There must be 1000s of situations like this. My GP mate and his partners are always looking to off load expenses on to the NHS, for god sakes he was even moaning about A4 paper for the printers! Look at the previous reply, that is exactly what is going on. A retired GP once said to me that the doctors today have it easy, they get so much more money and support and yet they only achieve HALF of what we did in my time.

 

Antonio Lex, Primary care pharmacist

I work directly with GPs and hear the opposite and those are self employed businessmen. No different to pharmacy contractors. Salaried GPS have it tough. 

Grumpy Pharm, Community pharmacist

Sorry but you will also find they receive "hidden" support with a lot of those costs as well that we arent able to access; training, rent,IT etc. They regard vaccinations already as a cash cow and to increase that fee by so much is money going straight to their bottom line.

Harry Tolly, Pharmacist

GP's have the BMA and RCGP and we have the luddite PSNC. END.

Olukunmi Popoola, Community pharmacist

yes end of story for pharmacy

Paul Miyagi, Information Technology

Didn't David Bowie write this song about Sue Sharpe - sure he did " Its a god awful small affair, to the girl with the mousy hair, but her pharmacists are yelling NO, and pharmacy has told her to go, but her friends are nowhere to be seen,now she walks through her sunken dream.........you get the picture.

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