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PSNC announces antifraud CEO as replacement for Sue Sharpe

Simon Dukes is "looking forward" to developing the "community pharmacy service for the future"
Simon Dukes is "looking forward" to developing the "community pharmacy service for the future"

Simon Dukes, current CEO of fraud prevention service Cifas, will replace Sue Sharpe as chief executive of the Pharmaceutical Services Negotiating Committee (PSNC) in May 2018.

Mr Dukes joined Cifas in 2013 and previously worked for the UK government in a "variety of roles and specialisms", covering counter-terrorism, cyber security and serious and organised crime investigations, according to the Cifas website.

Commenting on his new role, Mr Dukes said he is "looking forward" to developing the "community pharmacy service for the future".

"Community pharmacies perform a vital role for the citizen, and I am very pleased indeed to have been selected as the new CEO for PSNC," he added in a statement on the negotiator's website this morning (December 18).

Ms Sharpe – who in May, announced she would leave PSNC at the end of 2017 – said Mr Dukes' "experience and expertise from outside the health sector...will bring fresh thinking and strong leadership of the organisation".

"Unanimous" decision

According to PSNC chairman Mike Pitt, "a rigorous search and selection programme" was used to find Ms Sharpe's replacement.

"The appointments panel was unanimous in agreeing that Simon had all the qualities we were seeking, and would be the right person to lead the work of PSNC in the demanding environment community pharmacy faces," he said.

"The committee too approved the appointment unanimously, and we look forward to working with Simon."

The Twitter reaction
15 Comments
Question: 
What do you make of Sue Sharpe's replacement?

NISHI Patel, Community pharmacist

..and his knowledge in the sector is?

Watto 59, Pharmacy owner/ Proprietor

On the face of it this might not look a wise appointment, but we should not rush to judgement without full knowledge.  It is my opinion that the PSNC has for years done a difficult job badly.  This might be an opportunity for the PSNC to stop wasting their time trying to be reasonable with the DoH. Reasoned argument has not worked  so what  is going to change if this continues?  I suggest the PSNC concentrate on persuading the majority of contractors to agree to a concerted strategy of protest against  completely unacceptable contractual terms and conditions.  I do not care whether this is in their remit or not, it is about time they made it so.  For example we do no more than what the contract demands and/or even refuse to comply with parts of it.  It is not a fair contract if the terms have been  imposed so why are we so keen on complying?  On non contracted services we could immediatly stop ordering prescritions and managing repeats for patients or charge for doing it.  When something goes wrong we should send the patient back to the surgey to sort it out instead of wasting hours on the phone chasing lost or unwritten or incorrect prescriptions. We could stop deliveries or  charge a reasonable fee for doing them.  There should be a list of items monitored and updated by the PSNC which we refuse to dispense at a loss.  We should refer all of these back to the prescriber.   We need to be prepared to upset a few people which will incude customers and surgeries.  If we dont unite in some kind of protest we will continue to be exploited to our severe disadvantage. The PSNC could perform a vital role in coordinating such a strategy.  A charter of protest could be drawn up which all contractors would be encourages to sign up to.  The majority of contractors including Boots and Lloyds would need to be on board and of course the whole idea could fail miserably.   It seems apparent that PSNC have already failed with their existing methods. This may not be the answer but at the very least the PSNC need to do something different perhaps by adopting a  more aggressive or imaginative approach.  

Sunny Jim, Pharmacy Buyer

He’ll probably b on £150k plus an annum irrelevant if he gives Pharmacy a new deal. I doubt he’ll loose much zzzz if the status quo remains

NIRMAL BAJARIA, Superintendent Pharmacist

lucky if we still existing by the time he takes over in May.

Dave Downham, Manager

At least give the guy a chance!

Dave Downham, Manager

OK - don't then.

Barry Pharmacist, Community pharmacist

I wish him well. First item in his to-do list is to negotiate fair drug cost remuneration. No pressure there then.

M Yang, Community pharmacist

From what I gather, the overall opinion of Sue Sharpe has been pretty negative and under her tenure PSNC has never really negotiated decent deals. Then again, that could be because of how poorly regarded the sector has been by the government, especially one as deplorable and corrupt as the Tories. 

Simon Dukes might well be a political appointment put in place to be compliant, but perhaps it's about time the PSNC was operated less as a commercial body and something more akin to a professional organisation. If his credentials are anything to go by, Simon Dukes seems like someone who could be more efficient and direct.

C D, Community pharmacist

PSNC Chairman said "The Appointments Panel was unanimous that Simon had all the qualities we were seeking"   Good to see someone coming in who really understands the issues faced by contractors and has lots of relevant experience... oh no, hang on, knowledge or experience obviously were not qualities they were looking for... what a pity. Anyway, let's give him the benefit of the doubt and see what he actually delivers. At least he has run a commercial business before so... oh no, hang on.. 

Charles Whitfield Bott, Pharmacist Director

I guess we must all welcome this appointment as proof that you can move from one sector to another without any relevent experience, as it may well be something we all try to do in the not to distant future.

Priyesh Desai, Superintendent Pharmacist

A misfit for the job.No relvence at all. 

Andy Burrells, Community pharmacist

Former Anti fraud Officer called in to deal with the fraud that is concessionary prices. Laughable

Rubicon Mango, Academic pharmacist

Yayyyyyyyy! Another outside member who will negotiate on behalf of the community pharmacy sector yet has never worked in Pharmacy or healthcare. Degree in politics, am sure his high academic rigour in bull will come handy to lie to the members it represents whilst forming deals with the deaprtment of health and government. We need to know? Who makes these discussions and appointments because it all fits together that there is a sort of cartel/joint agenda going on.

Chris Locum, Locum pharmacist

Look at any of these high profile appointments and you see the same formula is applied. The same does not occur with the troops in the trench  - they must have relevant qualifications with decreasing remuneration.

Hadi Al-Bayati, Locum pharmacist

This made me lol!!!!

In agreement I might add

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